News/ Blog

Our Monthly Newsletter is featured in Focus Magazine.

22
Nov

Seller’s Block

By Steve Vacha
President, Home Standards Inspection Company

 

Many of us grow to be very emotionally connected to our homes. They are where we find comfort and rest. Even the inadequacies or deferred repairs often become normal to us, (especially to some of us males). When it comes time to sell however, prospective buyers often do not see the home through those same rose-colored glasses.  Many of us grow to be very emotionally connected to our homes. They are where we find comfort and rest. Even the inadequacies or deferred repairs often become normal to us, (especially to some of us males). When it comes time to sell however, prospective buyers often do not see the home through those same rose-colored glasses.

In addition to the obvious deferred repairs, there are the many hidden concerns such as maintenance and safety concerns that owners are not even aware of. The discerning buyer will then find out about these items when they have their home inspection completed.

Buyers often remember the deferred repairs and discrepancies of a property, and not the positive aspects of the property. The saying “can’t see the forest for the trees” fits this situation. The goal of the seller should be to remove these often minor problems of their home so potential buyers can see the positive aspects of a clean home.

Many sellers are finding a pre-listing inspection to be helpful in preparing their home for the market. By being proactive and completing a pre-listing inspection a seller can;

  • Identify and prioritize the list of concerns buyers would see or be told about in their home inspection.
  • Have time to repair and address these concerns.
  • If repairs are not made they can get estimates for the work needed, so buyers can see a realistic cost of repair.
  • Make the pre-inspection report available to prospective buyers on a walk through.

Prelisting inspections help prevent;

  • Buyers focusing on the negative aspects of the home.
  • Last minute surprises that a buyer’s home inspection could reveal, sometimes jeopardizing the sale.
  • Having to pay top dollar for repairs requested by the buyer in a short time frame, or having to use “licensed contractors” for most repairs.

Time is of the essence when selling a home. Often, if supplied with a pre-listing inspection the prospective buyer will choose not to pay for a home inspection themselves. This can save many days of anxious waiting time for the home inspection to be completed and then repairs to be requested and made.

The cost of a pre-listing inspection is miniscule compared to the money involved in the sale of a home, and the information gained can often be instrumental in the selling process of a home.


Comments are closed.